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Illustrated technical information covering Vol 2 Over 800 multi-choice systems questions Study notes and technical information Close up photos of internal and external components A compilation of links to major 737 news stories with a downloadable archive Illustrated history and description of all variants of 737 Detailed tech specs of every series of 737 Databases and reports of all the major 737 accidents & incidents General flightdeck views of each generation of 737's Description & news reports of Advanced Blended Winglets Press reports of orders and deliveries Articles from the press and official sources following the troubled history of the rudder PCU Details about 737 production methods A compilation of links to other sites with useful 737 content Get the book of the website A quick concise overview of the pages on this site

Sales

The Boeing 737 is the best-selling commercial aircraft in aviation history with almost 10,000 aircraft ordered.

The table and chart shows deliveries by series and year. Data is correct up to January 2013. 415 737s were delivered in 2012.

In 2012 Boeing took net orders for 1184 737s; that stands as the most of any model by any major commercial manufacturer in history. By 2012, the total number of 737NGs ordered was over 10,000, most of which were for the -800 series.

By 2012, the 737 had an order backlog of over 2300 aircraft, about one-third of the entire order backlog for all large commercial jets built by Boeing and Airbus. Little wonder that they are considering opening another production line to increase production to 60 aircraft per month.

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All of the information, photographs & schematics from this website and much more is now available in a 370 page printed book or EPUB available here.

*** Updated 28 Feb 2014 ***

Table

 

 Graph

One of the more difficult questions to answer is “How much does a 737 cost?” The answer is not that straightforward. It depends upon series, customer options about avionics and cabin fittings, and most significantly size of order and when it is placed.

The average list prices for 737s as of December 2012 were as follows:

  • 737-700 $74.8 million USD
  • 737-800 $89.1 million USD
  • 737-900ER $94.6 million USD
  • 737 MAX 7 $82.0 million USD
  • 737 MAX 8 $100.5 million USD
  • 737 MAX 9 $107.3 million USD

In February 2005, Ryanair placed an order for 70 737-800s with options for a further 70. The public list price was between $61.5 million to $69.5 million per aircraft as given on Boeing's Web site. However because of the size of the order and the fact that it was placed when Boeing had being losing a significant amount of orders to its rival Airbus, it is widely believed that Ryanair paid less than $51 million each; and by the time other concessions such as credit and allowances, support services and free winglets are factored in, the price could have been as low as $29 million - less than half of the list price.

There follows a collection of recent news items concerning 737 orders, deliveries and fleet movements.

For a full listing of 737 production and airlines current fleets try the following http://www.airfleets.net

Chris Brady

20 Mar 2013 - Ryaniar places order for 175 737-800s for delivery 2014-2017

Ryanair Holdings Plc (RYA) may buy as many as 200 of Boeing Co’s newest narrow-body jet, the 737 Max, later this year after placing a record-setting order for the model that’s being phased out.

Ryanair’s commitment to buy 175 of the existing 737-800 models, with a catalog value of $15.6 billion, is Boeing’s biggest European sale and will let the Dublin-based carrier add discount flights in markets vacated by full-service rivals. Ryanair may become a “lead customer” for the re-engined Max, with an order of 100 to 200 by year-end, Chief Executive Officer Michael O’Leary said.

“Today’s order is very much an interim order and a forerunner for what I very much hope will be an order for Max aircraft once our teams finish their study,” O’Leary said at a press conference in New York with Boeing Commercial Airplanes President Ray Conner. “We both hope the joint team we’ve established will report back and come up with a deal for a Max order sometime before the end of this calendar year.”

A Max order may help Boeing catch up to Airbus SAS’s new A320neo, which has outsold its rival and is set to enter service two years earlier. Airbus’s sales success makes it unlikely for Ryanair to get the discount it would want to buy the plane, O’Leary told analysts.

Europe’s biggest low-cost carrier last placed a major order in 2005 and has been contemplating a new deal for more than three years with deliveries from Boeing having ended in December. The carrier got a heavy discount on the last purchase and the new accord has similar terms, with “slightly higher prices,” O’Leary said.

Airbus Chief Operating Officer John Leahy spoke last week of an ongoing price war between the two planemakers, though Conner told investors March 4 that the aggressive pricing pressure to get initial Max orders had subsided. He also said Chicago-based Boeing would “be OK” on the so-called bridge pricing on the final orders for the current model.

Ryanair rose 4.8 percent to 6.08 euros in Dublin. Boeing advanced 0.4 percent to $85.51 at the close in New York.

The new jets, scheduled for delivery between late 2014 and 2018, will permit 5 percent annual growth and take passenger numbers above 100 million from 79 million in 2012, Ryanair said. A Max order would address expansion through 2019.

“This puts Ryanair back on a growth track which they were at risk of not seeing,” said Donal O’Neill, an analyst at Goodbody Stockbrokers with a buy rating on the stock.

O’Leary said the past year or so has seen a “significant uptick” in growth opportunities, with the failure of Spanair SA and Hungary’s Malev Zrt. plus job cuts at carriers spanning SAS AB of Scandinavia, the Iberia unit of International Consolidated Airlines Group SA (IAG) and discount rival Air Berlin Plc. (AB1)

“We needed this order to fill the gaps left by the likes of Iberia in Spain and SAS in Scandinavia as the network airlines concentrate on long-haul and feeder services,” he said in an interview.

Some 75 of the new planes will replace older ones, with the rest adding capacity, taking the total toward 400 aircraft, all of them 737-800s. The fleet might grow to more than 500 jetliners with a follow-on order that could reach a list price of more than $20 billion.

Ryanair had said it was also considering Airbus A320 planes, which have nine fewer seats, as well as the C919 from Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China, a new entrant to the single-aisle market. Another option was to grab jet orders from rivals struggling to fund purchases, though secondhand prices are high, making that option unattractive, O’Leary said.

The fleet deal will be funded from cash flow and debt, with some aircraft sold under so-called sale-and-leaseback arrangements. With capital outlays increasing this year and next, the Irish airline will hold off on further share repurchases and special dividends until 2015, it said.

Today’s order, Boeing’s largest this year, comes after Airbus won commitments for more than 400 A320 aircraft in the past week from Deutsche Lufthansa AG (LHA), Turkish Airlines (THYAO) and Lion Mentari Airlines PT of Indonesia.

The Ryanair contract helps fill up remaining delivery positions at Boeing as the U.S. manufacturer seeks to smooth the production transition from the current 737 to the Max model.

“We didn’t have a lot of open slots anyway, but this pretty much closes the gap we did have,” Boeing’s Conner said.“We have a few more left over, but not that much.”

The team evaluating the Max is probing several issues including whether buying the heavier model makes sense, since it will incur higher airport landing charges, O’Leary said.

 

02 Jan 2013 - 737 MAX orders exceed 1000

Boeing won an order for 60 of its upgraded single-aisle 737s from Aviation Capital Group LLC, a deal with a $6 billion catalog value that pushed purchases of the new plane past 1,000. The sale was completed in December and consists of 50 of the 737 Max-8 model and 10 of the Max-9 variant, Chicago-based Boeing said today in a statement. Airlines and lessors typically buy at a discount to list prices. Aviation Capital’s acquisition pushed orders for the 737 Max to 1,029, meeting a goal of about 1,000 for 2012 as Boeing plays catch-up with Airbus SAS, which outstripped Boeing in introducing an upgrade of its narrow-body airliner. The Max will feature more fuel-efficient engines and is set to enter service in 2017, after the scheduled 2015 debut for Airbus’s A320neo series. “Reaching 1,000 orders in just over a year’s time from our first order” shows the aircraft’s value for customers, said Bob Feldmann, vice president for the jet program. “Customers are expressing confidence in our ability to deliver improved performance on schedule.”

 

09 Aug 2012 - Boeing raises 737 prices

Boeing has increased the list price of its updated 737 Max aircraft by 4.5% for the first time since launching the plane last year. The 737 Max 8 and Max 9 now cost $100.5 and $107.3 million, respectively. The 737 Max 7, the smallest of the family, now sells for $82 million.

Customers rarely pay the list price for jets, typically negotiating discounts, though pre-delivery deposits are based on the published price and will rise as a result of the latest change.


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